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Detective
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Did you ever listen to these radios?

See "Pictures" for more old time radios

THIS INFORMATION ON PROGRAMS WAS FOUND ON THE INTERNET OR REFERENCE BOOKS I POSSESS.  CREDIT FOR INFORMATION WILL BE GIVEN IF AUTHOR IS KNOWN.

 


Detective Programs

The Shadow

"Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?  The Shadow knows!"  Then the voice would trail off into sinister laughter.  This was the familiar introduction to one of the most spine-chilling detective dramas ever produced for radio.  The Shadow "the invisible enforcer of law and order", commanded a faithful following in the millions during the Great Depression, when organized crime was running rampant.  The first show aired August 30, 1930 on Street and Smith's Detective Story Magazine Hour.  At first, the Shadow was merely the narrator who read stories from Street and Smith's crime magazine.  James La Curto was the first narrator, followed by Frank Readick, George Earle and Robert Andrews.  But listeners were so intrigued by the mysterious Shadow that he eventually became the star of the show, with his own stories to tell.  Street and Smith capitalized on The Shadow's popularity by publishing The Shadow Detective Monthly to complement the radio stories.  It was a successful move; both the radio show's ratings and the magazine's circulation soared.  Over nearly 3 decades, Street and Smith's writers produced almost 900 radio episodes and more than 300 pulp magazines featuring the Shadow.  Perhaps there will never be another fictional character that will so capture a nation's imagination.  The Shadow was created at a time when our minds were eager for something new and entertaining, and the "invisible enforcer" never disappointed.  this was written in "How We Had Fun" by Mario DeMarco West Boylston, Massachusetts.

The Saint

The Whistler

 

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Last modified: May 19, 2016